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Title Year Author(s) Abstract 
Beijing jian du kao 北京建都考1938Beijing te bie shi gong shu 北京特别市公署本书以为北京建都始于辽太宗会同元年(938年),至民国二十六年(1937年)为北京建都一千年。书中按时间顺序,排列辽、金、元、明、清各代皇帝的庙号、姓名、年号、在位年数,并计算每朝以北京为都城的时间。但此书文字粗略,其结论也值得商榷。
Shuang shan hui yi lu 双山回忆录1980Wang, Fanxi 王凡西《双山回忆录》,作者王凡西,早年参加中共,留学莫斯科东方大学(中山大学),1930年被开除出党。作者在20年代中期留学苏联时,即参加了托洛茨基反对派;1929年被遣送回国后,又从事党内反对派组织活动。作者毕生认为,苏共早期斯大林与托洛茨基的斗争,真理在托洛茨基一边;斯大林的大清洗和残酷斗争,与科学社会主义是格格不入的。20世纪90年代苏联模式的破产,并非是社会主义的失败,应该将斯大林主义和真正的社会主义区别开来。
Tian gong kai wu 天工開物1637Song, Yingxing 宋英星 ( Ming 明)天工开物》是中国古代一部综合性的科学技术著作,有人也称它是一部百科全书式的著作,作者是明朝科学家宋应星
《天工开物》记载了明朝中叶以前中国古代的各项技术。全书分为上中下三篇18卷。并附有123幅插图,描绘了130多项生产技术和工具的名称、形状、工序。
《天工开物》是世界上第一部关于农业和手工业生产的综合性著作,被法国汉学家儒莲称为“技术百科全书”[1]。它对中国古代的各项技术进行了系统地总结,构成了一个完整的科学技术体系。对农业方面的丰富经验进行了总结,全面反映了工艺技术的成就。书中记述的许多生产技术,一直沿用到近代。
Kōan kiroku 13 考案記錄. 第13回1930Rikugun Zōheishō 陸軍造兵廠 (ed.)This is a series of training manuals for various weapons produced between 1927 and 1935 by the Japanese Imperial Army.
Cadastre - Plans des sections1902Concession française de ShanghaiThis is a reproduction in book form of the original 1902 cadastral map of the French Concession. Individual maps from this bound volume are also available in the Map Collection of the Virtual Shanghai platform.
Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 13 1921-1924]2008This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.
The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1864-18662001Shanghai Municipal CouncilThe minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.
The politics of community building in urban China2011Heberer, Thomas; Göbel, ChristianThe aim of this book is to make sense of the recent reform of neighbourhood institutions in urban China. It builds on the observation that the late 1990s saw a comeback of the state in urban China after the increased economization of life in the 1980s had initially forced it to withdraw from society. The authors hypothesise that the central government has indeed displayed an impressive adaptive capacity with regards to the social problems in China's shequs. It has managed to bring the party-state back into urban society by enhancing its infrastructural power to provide better social welfare.
The Communist Takeover of Hangzhou: The Transformation of City and Cadre, 1949-19542004Gao, James ZhengExisting literature on the Chinese Revolution takes into account the influence of peasant society on Mao's ideas and policies but rarely discusses a reverse effect of comparable significance: namely, how peasant cadres were affected by the urban environment into which they moved. In this detailed examination of the cultural dimension of regime change in the early years of the Revolution, James Gao looks at how rural-based cadres changed and were changed by the urban culture that they were sent to dominate. He investigates how Communist cadres at the middle and lower levels left their familiar rural environment to take over the city of Hangzhou and how they consolidated political control, established economic stability, developed institutional reforms, and created political rituals to transform the urban culture. His book analyzes the interplay between revolutionary and nonrevolutionary culture with respect to the varying degrees with which they resisted and adapted to each other. It reveals the essential role of cultural identity in legitimizing the new regime and keeping its revolutionary ideal alive. Based on extensive research in regional and local archives in Zhejiang province
Minutes of the Nineteenth Annual General Meeting of Electors of the British Municipal Area held in the Gordon Hall on Wednesday, April 7, 19371937British Municipal Council, TientsinBilingual edition of the minutes of the AGM of the Electors of the British Municipal Area
Service List 海關職員提名錄1947Staff Secretariat, Inspectorate General of Customs 海關總稅務司署人事科

This document provides the full list of the staff of the Chinese Maritime Customs, both in Chinese and English, as well as its organizational structure structure and some basic statistics.

Service List, 1948 海關職員提名錄1948Staff Secretariat, Inspectorate General of Customs 海關總稅務司署人事科

This document provides the full list of the staff of the Chinese Maritime Customs, both in Chinese and English, as well as its organizational structure structure and some basic statistics.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 16 1928-1930]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 17 1931-1935]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 1 1839-1846]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 2 1847-1852]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 3 1853-1856]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 4 1857-1862]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 5 1863-1866]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 6 1867-1873]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 7 1874-1878]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 8 1879-1883]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 9 1884-1893]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 10 1894-1899]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 11 1900-1913]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 12 1914-1920]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 18 1936-1943]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 14 1925-1926]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

Shanghai political & economic reports, 1842-1943 [Vol. 15 1927]2008

This collection of primary documents, establishes a comprehensive series of despatches, in the main from the British consul in Shanghai to the British ambassador to China based usually in Peking, but in the 1930s based in Shanghai itself. The form and extent of communications vary during the period, and include annual reports and trade returns, judicial reviews, despatches on topics of interest and telegrams on urgent matters. After 1920 series of quarterly political reports and six-monthly intelligence summaries are initiated, and some other irregular periodic reports emerge. There is regular information on the government of the Settlement, and reports on the opium trade; there are extended reports, in 1856, on the continuing Taiping Rebellion, and later, reports on the Sino-Japanese war over the control of Korea; from 1901-11 reports include: the Boxer Rebellion; commentary on the French settlement; anti-government conspirators in Shanghai; the Russo-Japanese war; the Shanghai tramway system; the bubonic plague in Shanghai; the Chinese revolution of 1911-12; British intelligence reports on German activities, 1914-18; and in the mid-1920s telegrams reflect the impact of the civil war in China, and report “the Shanghai incident”. The collection of documents ends with the winding up of the Settlement under wartime Japanese occupation, and numerous papers in 1942 carry discussion of this conclusion.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1854-18632001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1867-18692001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1870-18712001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1872-18732001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1874-18762001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1877-18822001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1883-18862001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1887-18892001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1890-18922001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1893-18952001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1895-18962001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1897-18982001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1899-19012001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1902-19042001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1911-19132001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1905-19072001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1908-19102001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1917-19192001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1914-19162001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1920-19212001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1922-19242001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1925-19272001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1928-19302001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1931-19322001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1933-19352001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1936-19392001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council - 1940-19432001Shanghai Municipal Council

The minutes of the Shanghai Municipal Council offer a detailed view of the internal management of municipal affairs in the International Settlement of Shanghai from 1854 to 1943.

Report for the year 1941 and budget for the year 1942 - Shanghai Municipal Council1942

The Report for the Year.. is the annual report by the municipal administration of the International Settlement (Shanghai Municipal Council). It contains the reports by the various municipal departments and committees.

Dian shi zhai hua bao 點石齋畫報 [Part I] 1884

The Dianshizhai huabao 點石齋畫報 "Illustrated Lithographer" was an illustrated magazine that achieved great attention in the late 19th century because it was produced on a lithographic basis, which made it possible to reach a large public. The name is derived from a building within the complex of the Shenbao Publishing House 申報館 in Shanghai where lithographic prints could be produced. Publisher of the "Illustrated Lithographer" was the British Ernest Major (1841-1908, Chinese name Meicha 美查) who also published the famous newpaper Shenbao 申報 "Shanghai News". The first issue of the Dianshizhai huabao was published on May 8, 1884 in Shanghai, the last issue came out in 1898. There were in total 528 issues (according to a lower estimation, 473 issues) including more than 4,600 illustrations. The magazine appeared on a ten-day basis (xunkan 旬刊). Each issue had the same format containing eight pages with 8 illustrations. Collectors could then assemble each issue in a traditional thread-bound booklet. The issues were numbered according to the Heavenly Stems, Earthly Branches, musical notes and the so-called Six Arts. It was sold separately or was given as a free supplement to subscribers of the newspaper Shenbao. [Source: http://www.bc.edu/research/chinagateway/culthist/dianshizhai_intro.html]
 

Dian shi zhai hua bao 點石齋畫報 [Part II] 1884

The Dianshizhai huabao 點石齋畫報 "Illustrated Lithographer" was an illustrated magazine that achieved great attention in the late 19th century because it was produced on a lithographic basis, which made it possible to reach a large public. The name is derived from a building within the complex of the Shenbao Publishing House 申報館 in Shanghai where lithographic prints could be produced. Publisher of the "Illustrated Lithographer" was the British Ernest Major (1841-1908, Chinese name Meicha 美查) who also published the famous newpaper Shenbao 申報 "Shanghai News". The first issue of the Dianshizhai huabao was published on May 8, 1884 in Shanghai, the last issue came out in 1898. There were in total 528 issues (according to a lower estimation, 473 issues) including more than 4,600 illustrations. The magazine appeared on a ten-day basis (xunkan 旬刊). Each issue had the same format containing eight pages with 8 illustrations. Collectors could then assemble each issue in a traditional thread-bound booklet. The issues were numbered according to the Heavenly Stems, Earthly Branches, musical notes and the so-called Six Arts. It was sold separately or was given as a free supplement to subscribers of the newspaper Shenbao. [Source: http://www.bc.edu/research/chinagateway/culthist/dianshizhai_intro.html]
 

Records of the Shanghai Municipal Police 1894-19491993National Archives and Records Administration

INTRODUCTION

On the 67 rolls of this microfilm publication, M1750, are reproduced some of the Shanghai Municipal Police investigation files, 1894-1944. These files are part of the records of the Central Intelligence Agency, Record Group (RG) 263.

Background

Before World War II, Shanghai was divided into three sovereign jurisdictions. The French Concession occupied a small area close to the city center while the largest jurisdiction, both in population and area, was the Chinese Municipality of Greater Shanghai; part of the Republic of China. However, the city's commercial and industrial core, the great port, fashionable clubs, hotels, and consulates aII were located in the third jurisdiction, the International Settlement, .an entity unique in world politics. This International Settlement did not belong to any one power; its ruling body, known as the Shanghai Municipal Council and elected by the ,"ratepayers," was composed of citizens of a number of powers. Although "international" in outward appearance, during most of its history the Council was effectively controJled by British interests. The settlement's law enforcement agency was the Shanghai Municipal Police (SMP). While the force included Chinese, Indian, and later Russian and Japanese personnel, until World War II the Commissioner and senior officers were alwaj,s British. The functions of the police force were dictated by the strange political demarcations of Shanghai and by the opportunities they presented for criminal activity. ·The SMP.Special Branch also served as an intel1igence gathering and, occasionally, as an executive arm of the British Secret Intelligence Service in the Far East. As a center of political activity in China and the home of a cosmopolitan population (including thousands of White Russian emigr~. as well as 20,000 Jewish refugees), Shanghai was a natural target for intelligence operations by several powers.

In 1938, as the Japanese expanded their control over sections of China, they demanded increased representation on the Shanghai Municipal Council and also on its ·police force. After Pearl Harbor the Japanese invited the British and American personnel serving on both to continue their duties under Japanese supervision; however, by July 1942, all British officers of the SMP had been forced to resign. These individuals later spent the remainder of the war in internment camps. When the Japanese took over the city in December 1941, they left the collection of.police files largely intact. The only ones that they apparently removed were Special Branch reports on Japanese personalities. In the spring of 1949, as Communist forces approached Shanghai, the Nationalist Chinese garrison commander gave the remaining Special Branch files to the local American Strategic Services Unit (SSU), a military intelligence successor of the OSS. (The SSU was later integrated into the Central InteI1igence Agency.) When the files were hurriedly loaded on board an American warship, some of the boxes fell into the Whangpoo River; others were damaged when the ship transporting them ran into a typhoon. However, most of the files safely reached Japan and, eventually, the United States. General C. A. Willoughby, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2 (Military Intelligence), in General Douglas MacArthur's Far Eastern Command, used the files as the main source for his special investigation of Soviet double agent Richard Sorge, who served in Shanghai in the I930's. Several volumes of extracted materials were bound up for this purpose. The records were eventually transferred to the Central Intelligence Agency and later to the National Archives.

Records  Description

Records of the Shanghai Municipal Police transferred to the National Archives included both microfilm and original records. The major portion of the microfilm, 67 rolls identified as the "investigation files," was created by the U.S. Army, apparently in support of General Willoughby'"investigative activities. It is this Army-prepared microfilm that constitutes M1750. The criteria for selection of records to be film~ are not known; the effort did not always preserve the SMP's original filing-schemes and Sometimes only portions of a particular file were filmed. Nevertheless, the film makes accessible a substantial portion of some very interesting records, and numerous researchers have requested copies of it. This publication responds to that interest. Because this film was not created under ideal filming conditions, there are problems associated with its use. Archivists working with the files of the Shanghai Municipal Police in National Archives custody have learned that while there is considerable overlap between the microfilm and the paper records, many paper records were not filmed and some filmed files were not transferred to the National Archives in paper form. Appendix A is a list of investigative files of the S:MP from which records were selected for inclusion in Ml750. The arrangement of the listed files follows as closely as possible the order apparently intended by the Shanghai Municipal Police. The list includes records that exist only on paper, records that exist only on microfilm, and records that exist both on paper and on microfilm. The list distinguishes between these record types in the following manner: list entries for records that exist only on paper include a box number, a file number. and a file description, but no roll number; list entries that exist only on microfilm include a roll number, a file number, and a file description, but no box number; and list entries that exist in both paper and microfilm include a box number, a roll number, a file number, and a file description. In some cases file descriptions are transcribed file titles, even to the extent of retaining the original British spelling of words; but in most cases they are NARA-prepared summaries of file content.

Appendix B describes other records of the Shanghai Municipal Police that have been allocated to National Archives Record Group 263. These include the "Willoughby Collection," the SMP documents selected and bound in 20 volumes by G-2 (Military Intelligence) in connection with the Sorge investigation; a microfilm copy of registration cards of Russian emigrants, 1940-4S; a microfilm copy of registration certificates of the Russian Emigrants Committee, 1944-4S; a microfilm copy of the Tsingtao Registration Cards, 194649; and miscellaneous other records.

   
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